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3 Ways to Improve your posture

Is Bad Posture Affecting Your Life?

Having neck or jaw pain?  Bad posture can affect your life in more ways than you might imagine. When your posture is poor, your body is misaligned and excessive and repeated strain is put on the neck muscles, low back and even the jaw.

Incorrect posture doesn’t happen overnight: rather it is the result of years of unconscious slouching, sloping and hunching–when sitting, standing or even sleeping. We all know how easy it is to slouch when we’re tired, but the bad news is that poor posture isn’t just a result of tiredness, it’s also a cause of it: when your muscles aren’t working properly to support your head, fatigue is the result.

This is why it’s vital to try to maintain good posture whenever possible. This may require retraining your body to naturally default to positions where the right set of muscles are keeping you upright and aligned.

You don’t necessarily have to spend money on gadgets to improve your posture; just paying attention to how you sit and stand, and doing a few exercises, can lead to good results.

Maintain Your Posture When Sitting

The human body is not designed to spend long periods sitting in a chair, but many of us spend our entire days doing just that. Aside from trying to reduce the time you spend sitting–by getting up from your desk when you can, or by doing more of your job standing–the best thing you can do is to make sure your chair is properly supporting you, and that you in turn are using the chair correctly.

Modern office chairs are endlessly adjustable; it’s a good idea to spend some time experimenting with your own. The most important thing to remember is that your lumbar region should be well supported. Adjust the chair so its lumbar support fits snugly with your lower back, and try to avoid the temptation to inch forward.

Additionally, your elbows should be at your side when you use your keyboard, and your eye level should be at the top of your monitor. Try to remember to rest your feet flat on the floor.

Employers are obliged to make sure their staff can work comfortably, so if you find your chair doesn’t support you as well as it could, you should ask for a different one.

Good Posture When Standing

The most important thing to do when standing is to find your center. This is when your mass is evenly distributed through your body and each muscle supports only the weight it’s evolved to bear.

To achieve this, you should stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, and make sure you’re carrying your weight on the balls of your feet, rather than your heels. Keep your shoulders squared and your head straight. Pretend you are balancing a book on your head and stand so that it wouldn’t fall off.

The good thing is, when you master good standing posture, you’ll not only be healthier, you’ll look more confident too.

Posture During Exercises

Regular exercise will improve your posture, but if you suspect yours is particularly bad there are some areas it’s worth concentrating on. Ideally, you should look to strengthen your core–that is, your abs and back. Having underdeveloped core muscles is both a symptom and a cause of poor posture. Try to incorporate core-strengthening exercises, such as sit-ups and the plank, into your daily routine.

Bad posture doesn’t happen overnight and it can’t be cured overnight either. If you want to improve yours (and in so doing improve your health), you must always be mindful of how you stand and sit.

If you are worried that poor posture is doing long-term damage to your health–or if you’re in pain–it’s a good idea to see a physical therapy specialist. They will recommend treatment, changes to your daily routine or an exercise plan that will help bring your body back towards balance and alignment.

More About Rehab Guru’s Blog:

Stop by our site regularly for the latest therapeutic treatment updates and news.  As always you can find our home page here: https://omaharehabguru.com/

PT and Myofascial Pain Syndrome

Finding Effective Treatment for Myofascial Pain Syndrome

One of the lesser-known disorders that causes debilitating discomfort and fatigue is myofascial pain syndrome, or MPS. It is somewhat similar to fibromyalgia, as the patient feels pain at trigger points and in muscles at various places in the body. The term myofascial refers to the connective tissue covering the muscles, which is medically known as fascia.

working out knots in upper backAbout Trigger Points

Trigger points are exceptionally sensitive areas of the muscles that may feel achy in general and especially uncomfortable when someone presses directly on them. People commonly refer to them as knots.

A person with MPS also experiences muscle discomfort in other areas that seem unrelated to the trigger points. Doctors call this referred pain.

Patients with this disorder may experience sudden muscle spasms at times with even more intense discomfort.

Diagnosing MPS

The condition is referred to as a syndrome because it is diagnosed through a group of symptoms associated with MPS. As of yet, there is no definitive diagnostic procedure like a blood test or imaging technique that can verify a patient has the disorder.

Treatment for MPS

A doctor may treat the knots with injections of a local anesthetic, or a combination of an anesthetic and a corticosteroid. This allows the muscle to relax.

Physical therapy can be very effective for these patients, and massage therapy is recommended as well.

Medication for Related Issues

Certain factors that aggravate MPS symptoms create a vicious cycle. Lack of sleep, for instance, can worsen symptoms, while chronic pain can easily disrupt sleep. Stress and depression make the patient feel worse physically, while the condition itself causes stress and emotional strain.

The doctor may prescribe pain relief medication or muscle relaxants that have sedating effects. The patient takes these before bedtime. Antidepressant medication may be helpful as well, as many of these drugs also are pain relievers. The patient then benefits both from mood improvement and reduced physical discomfort.

Seeking Help From a Physical Therapist

Patients dealing with these debilitating symptoms are strongly encouraged to seek treatment at an integrated health center or a pain management clinic. Receiving a combination of conventional and complementary therapies tends to have the best results.  At Rehab Guru Physical Therapy, we offer several modalities of treatment for your myofascial pain.  Please text or call us at 402-740-8400 or schedule an appointment online and together we will create a treatment plan that is right for you.

More About Rehab Guru’s Blog:

Stop by our site regularly for the latest physical therapy updates, news and treatments.  As always you can find our home page here: https://omaharehabguru.com/